Ambrosia Halts all Procedures

A controversial startup focused on offering blood-transfusions with young people’s blood for USD 8000 called Ambrosia decided to stop providing all procedures after receiving warnings from federal regulators. Regulators with the Food and Drug Administration are warning people to not go through with the procedure. There’s also little to no hard evidence that the procedure had any benefits even though the Company has said that the blood transfusions offer health benefits such as anti-aging.

FDA commissioner, Scott Gottlieb, and the Director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Peter Marks, said in a joint statement, “Our concerns regarding treatments using plasma from young donors are heightened by the fact that there is no compelling clinical evidence on its efficacy, nor is there information on appropriate dosing for treatment of the conditions for which these products are being advertised. Plasma is not FDA-recognized or approved to treat conditions such as normal aging or memory loss, or other diseases like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease.”

The statement did not specifically target Ambrosia, but “establishments in several states that are offering infusions of plasma from young donors to purportedly treat the effects of a variety of conditions.”

Ambrosia founder Jesse Karmazin, previously told Business Insider that he was charging USD 8000 for one liter of young blood and USD 12000 for two liters. He also told Business Insider, “the transfusions were safe and reliable, despite little to no hard scientific evidence demonstrating either its safety or its benefits.”

However, the statement by the FDA regulators states otherwise.

“Our concerns regarding treatments using plasma from young donors are heightened by the fact that there is no compelling clinical evidence on its efficacy, nor is there information on appropriate dosing for treatment of the conditions for which these products are being advertised. Plasma is not FDA-recognized or approved to treat conditions such as normal aging or memory loss, or other diseases like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease. Moreover, reports we’re seeing indicate that the dosing of these infusions can involve administration of large volumes of plasma that can be associated with significant risks including infectious, allergic, respiratory and cardiovascular risks, among others.”

Patients that go through with the procedures may be putting themselves at risk for thousands of dollars instead of gaining any health benefits.

The first clinical trials were held in 2017 which involved patients paying USD 8000 for 1.5 liters of plasma from a donor between the ages of 16 and 25 over two days. Business Insider reported, “As of September, the company had infused close to 150 people, ranging in age from 35 to 92, with the blood of younger donors, Cavalier said. Of those, 81 participated in its clinical trial.”  The reports of the study was not made public, but Karmazin told Business Insider that they were “really positive.”

As of Tuesday afternoon, Ambrosia’s website had been changed to read: “In compliance with the FDA announcement issued February 19, 2019, we have ceased patient treatments.”

1 Comment
  1. John Reznick 3 years ago
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    I needed blood transfusion once after injury; did not want it & asked Doc about safety–“Hep C=biggest risk”. Nobel winner for oncogene discovery said blood contains every sort of microbe!

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